WTC - Heart

Several research studies indicate that people working or residing near Ground Zero in 2001-2002 are at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. It is hypothesized that this increased risk is a result of environmental exposure, mental health consequences, or both. 

Current methods for assessing risk of cardiovascular disease are based on populations that have not been exposed to environmental disasters and do not account for mental health and air pollution. Environmental exposure and mental health have both been shown to impact cardiovascular health and these factors are particularly relevant to WTC responders. Therefore it is likely that current modes of predicting cardiovascular risk underestimate the true risk for WTC responders. . 

WTC-HEART is a rigorous cohort study of 6,481 responders and volunteers that participate in the WTC Health Program. This study will provide unique evidence of actual cardiovascular disease risk and predicted cardiovascular disease risk in WTC responders in order to guide the implementation of important preventive interventions. In addition to its direct relevance for the health surveillance of WTC workers, this study will accrue new knowledge on the long-term effects of a major environmental disaster on cardiovascular health. 

Contact: Professor Alfredo Morabia:http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/EES/pep/morabia.html 

Principal Investigator: Alfredo Morabi, MD.
Contact Information: [email protected]

Study Director: Zoey Laskaris, MPH.
Contact Information: [email protected]

Alfredo Morabia
Alfredo Morabia

Alfredo Morabia has an MD from the University of Geneva, and a PhD in Epidemiology and an MS in Biostatistics, from The Johns Hopkins University. He was Professor and Head of the Division of Clinical Epidemiology at the Geneva University Hospital from 1990 to 2005, and has, since 2006, held the position of Professor of Epidemiology at the Center for the Biology of Natural Systems at Queens College, CUNY, and at the Department of Epidemiology of Columbia University, New York. His current research interests include the assessment of the impact of public transportation on commuter's health, and the description and analysis of when, why and how epidemiologic methods and concepts appeared and evolved. He is Chief Editor of Preventive Medicine, and Editor of the James Lind Library (www.jameslindlibrary.org) and of the People's Epidemiology Library (www.epidemiology.ch/history/betaversion.htm).